Sweet January by Terveen Gill

Blog by Terveen Link

The sky bled into the water, just as her womb had bled the day January was born. Her first and only child had been covered in blood and the remnants of a nine month cocoon. The nurse had leaned in with her bundle of joy; the first kiss, the most ancient of traditions. A sweet softness brushed her lips as a wail of resistance pierced her ears. It was the first time she had sensed the dislike. She named her January even though she was born in July, a paradoxical innovation.

Time rushed forward, ushering January towards the boundary of womanhood. She watched nervously as her daughter’s inherent dislike for the world transformed into methods to deceive her. She tried her best to appease the demons devouring her child, yet words were a meaningless effort.

January, I love you.

Please come home, darling.

Do not ruin your life.

She gazed into January’s eyes, dark and withdrawn, searching for a reason behind the hatred and the lies. It was upon the porch step, one hot evening in August, that January wept and hissed all her resentment. It came as no surprise. The girl had little self-worth and a life-time of complaints.

A single question burned January’s mind – Why was I ever born?!

A befitting reply scorched her lips – I just want to die!

There was no consolation worthy of banishing a teenager’s contempt for her own life.

Kisses and hugs were strangers to them now, yet as a mother she clung to hope. Her daughter January would come back to her, it was simply a matter of time. But certain expectations have early expirations, and neither could ever reach the summit of reconciliation. 

Then came the late night phone call she had always dreaded. It confiscated her sanity. A girl had been found, battered and bound, stripped of her dignity.

She wished she had been blinded, and thus saved from the grisly sight. A wave of resentment crashed against her, wiping away the endless fright. Her worries left her to weep in seclusion. She leaned in to kiss the cold and hardened cheek. It was the final farewell.

The dislike was buried deep, and the animosity was laid to rest.  Now, each passing year without January would remind her that time would never be complete again.


20 Comentarios Agrega el tuyo

  1. Terveen, you have outdone yourself with this beautiful piece of writing. You managed to reflect melancholy in the best heartfelt, emotional way. Every word you wrote could be felt. I love it. Well done, my friend.

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  2. Terveen Gill dice:

    Thank you so much, Shobana. 🙂
    Melancholy has a way of sweeping us away.
    Yet it often brings us together.
    I appreciate your kind words.

    Me gusta

  3. An emotional and well-written piece Terveen…..

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    1. Terveen Gill dice:

      Thank you so much, Don. 🙂

      Me gusta

  4. Simmi dice:

    An outstanding piece. Loved it! ♥️ ♥️ ♥️

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    1. Terveen Gill dice:

      Thank you so much, Simmi. 🙂
      I appreciate it.

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      1. Simmi dice:

        You’re most welcome! 🙂

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  5. Hear-breaking, Terveen, and the depths of a mother’s love – and knowledge.
    I like how the girl’s name carries echoes of cold and ice, to match her personality.
    Well done!

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    1. Terveen Gill dice:

      Thank you so much, Patricia. 🙂
      It is a sorrowful tale. A mother’s heart stretches its limits.
      It’s heart-wrenching to witness one’s own child destroy themselves.
      Yes, the name carries a lot of meaning.

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  6. tony espino dice:

    Great story, Terveen! I like not knowing the mother’s name for some reason. Almost like a reflection of how insignificant she was to January. One of my favorite lines was «But certain expectations have early expirations, and neither could ever reach the summit of reconciliation.» It’s so poetic and fun to read. There’s definitely a rhythm to it like a rap from Hamilton. I think it’s awesome. You have wonderful skills!

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    1. Terveen Gill dice:

      Thank you so much, Tony. 🙂
      The mother is an insignificant presence in the story. She probably feels that way about herself too.
      I’m glad you picked up on that.
      And the rhyme in that line just came to me. It’s the odd one out, but I decided to keep it.
      I always appreciate your feedback.

      Me gusta

  7. Jeff Flesch dice:

    Mmmm. A powerful and heart achingly tragic story, Terveen. Your writing about the human experience is always so vivid, so alive, it’s as if we are there with these characters – we feel their love, their loss. Well done, my friend. 😊

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    1. Terveen Gill dice:

      Thanks a lot, Jeff. 🙂
      Emotions bind us together. We experience them every day.
      They are the common ground upon which we relate with each other.
      Your words offer great encouragement.

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      1. Jeff Flesch dice:

        Indeed, that’s so true, Terveen. They do bind us together, and are a point of relation. Agreed. You’re most welcome, my friend. Always. 😊

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  8. sikhcomics dice:

    Outstanding piece of writing. It is heartbreaking to have a child like January. Nurture can’t possibly change what nature has destined.

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    1. Terveen Gill dice:

      I agree. Some things aren’t changeable. It’s just how it is. Good or bad.
      We can only watch and see. Thank you so much. 🙂

      Me gusta

  9. jonicaggiano dice:

    What a gut wrenching story. This is beautifully written. The beginning brings you in slowly but the tension begins to mount. It talks to the pulling away that teenagers do which can be so hurtful. Yet we have to let them go. Great ending although tragically sad it is written so well you can see the woman in the morgue saying her last goodbye. Every mother’s worse fear during that rebellious age. Amazing read. Sending hugs 🤗 Joni

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    1. Terveen Gill dice:

      Thank you so much, Joni. I can see a mother’s tender heart beating in your words. It’s really a no-win situation when children rebel and associate recklessness with freedom. And that anger and sadness has no outlet but to explode within and create dismal and dangerous situations. I love reading your comments. They bear so much meaning. Sorry, I’m late in replying. Missed this one.
      Take care and much peace and joy. 🙂

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      1. jonicaggiano dice:

        You are welcome. You are so right too. Don’t ever worry about missing a comment. Everyone is busy. I appreciate your kind comment. You take care too and much love, peace and joy. ❤️🤗

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